Department of Applied Chemistry & Chemical Engineering

News

Event

Syllabus for B. Sc (Honours)

 

Syllabus for B.Sc. (Honors)

Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical  Engineering (ACCE)

University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000, Bangladesh.

 

B.Sc. (Honors) course in Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering under Integrated Course System from the session 2013-2014 and onward.

 

1. Graduation Criteria

 

1.1 Name of  Degree: B.Sc. (Honors) in Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

 

1.2 Entrance qualification: H.S.C. (Science) with Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics.

 

1.3 Definition of a Credit:

The credit is defined as follows:

  • For theoretical courses, 15 class hour of 50 minutes each= 1credit
  • For practical courses, 30 hour lab work = 1 credit.

 

1.4 Total Credits: A total of 160 credits of which the major course will consist of 98 credits of theoretical courses; 25.5 credits of practical; 11 credits of field work, in-plant training and project; and 5.5 credits for viva-voce. Students will have to take 20 credits of minor courses (Physics-Theoretical and Practical and Mathematics). A student has to complete for graduation all the credits prescribed by the syllabus committee for the session s/he is registered.

 

1.5 Total Years: Honors Degree shall be extended over a period of 4 academic years. A student will be given 2(two) extra years in addition to 4 years to complete his/her degree; however, a student will be allowed to have readmission once in an year and total year of graduation (06 years) should not be exceeded. Each academic year have a duration of 12 calendar months to be distributed as follows:

30 weeks                for holding classes

4 weeks                  preparation for examinations

6 weeks                  annual examination and publications of results

12 weeks                vacation and holidays  

 

 

2. Examination System

 

A student will be evaluated continuously in the courses system, for theoretical classes s/he will be assessed by class attendance, in-course assessment and final examination. For laboratory courses, a student will be assessed by class attendance, observation of his performance at work, viva-voce during laboratory works, evaluation of laboratory reports and practical examination. Field work and In-plant training are evaluated based on submission of a report, by a written examination and viva-voce. Project work is evaluated on continuous assessment basis by respective guide and evaluation of project’s report by the examiners.

 

2.1 Distribution of Marks: The marks of a given course will be as follows:

 

Theoretical Courses

Class Attendance:                                                                  5%

                        In-course Assessment:                                                 25%

                        Final examination:                                                                   70%

 

Laboratory Courses

Attendance:                                                                           20%

                        Performance and Report:                                             20%

                        Final examination:                                                                   60%

Field Work / In-plant Training

Report                                                                                               40%

                        Written examination                                                    40%

                        Viva-voce                                                                                20%

Project

                        Continuous Assessment                                                           20%

                        Report                                                                                      80%

 

2.1.1 Class Attendance: The marks for class participation will be as follows:

                        Attendance                              Marks

                        90% and above                        5%

                        85% to 89%                             4%                  

                        80% to 84%                             3%                  

                        75% to 79%                             2%                  

                        60% to 74%                             1%                  

                        Less than 60%                         0

 

A student will not be allowed to appear at the examination of a course if his/her class attendance in that courses is less than 60%

 

2.1.2 Final Examination: The final examination procedure will be as follows:

(a) Examination Committee: The examination committee will be formed consisting of 3 members from the same discipline and an external from outside for the final examination. The questions for the final examination will be prepared by the course teachers from the departments. The examination committee will moderate the questions for the final examination. The course teachers, who set the question will examine and mark the answer scripts separately. The two marks will be averaged by the tabulators. If the marks by the two examiners differ by more than 20% the concerned answer scripts will be examined by a third examiner recommended by the examination committee and the closest two marks among the three will be taken for average by the tabulators. All marks within a particular course domain will be added together to assign the final grade of that course.

 

(b) Duration of the Final Examination: For theoretical, field work, project and In-plant training courses of all sessions there should be a 1 (one) hour final examination for every course having 1 credit hour. Accordingly, final examination hour will proportionately vary with the course credit hours. For laboratory courses the time for the final examinations will be six (06) hours for each section.

3. Grading System

 

3.1 Letter Grade and Grade Point: Letter Grade and corresponding Grade-point will be awarded as follows:

 

Numerical Grade

Letter Grade

Grade Point

80% and above

A+

4.00

75% to 79%

A

3.75

70% to 74%

A-

3.50

65% to 69%

B+

3.25

60% to 64%

B

3.00

55% to 59%

B-

2.75

50% to 54%

C+

2.50

45% to 49%

C

2.25

40% to 44%

D

2.00

Less than 40%

F

0.00

 

 

3.2.1 GPA: Grade Point Average (GPA) is the weighted average of the points obtained in all the courses completed by a student in an academic year.

 

3.2.2 CGPA: Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) will be calculated by the weighted average of previous CGPA and current GPA.

 

3.2.3 F Grades: ‘F’ grade will not be counted for GPA and student has to retake the examination of the respective course up to twice with the immediately two following sessions only. Those who are having ‘F’ grade in any course s/he will not be eligible for the degree. However, the grade can be improved to B+ at best in applicable case.

 

3.2.4 Improvement:

  • If a student obtain a grade ‘C+’ or lower in a course in any year, he/she will be allowed to repeat the term final examination only once preferably with the following batch for the purpose of grade improvement but he/she will not be eligible to get a grade better than ‘B+’ in such a course. A student failing to improve his/her grade in a course can retain the earlier grade.
  • Grade improvement will not be allowed in those courses in which a student obtains grade better than ‘C+’.
  • A student will be allowed to repeat a maximum of 20 credits in four years B.S. Program for grade improvement purpose. However, a student can be allowed to take maximum courses of 8.0 credits in a particular academic year for the stated purpose.
  • There will be no improvement examination for practical, viva-voice, in-course and field work.

 

3.2.5 Readmission

  • A student can take readmission 2 (two) times throughout the program either in the same class or in different classes. In both cases, he/she must complete the degree by 6 (six) years from the time of original admission.
  • A student may seek readmission and continue studies as a regular student provided he/she has at least 30% attendance in the previous year.
  • On readmission, grades earned earlier by a student in the case of readmission shall, in general, cease to exist and the student has to retake all courses and examinations, but in case if they do not get the opportunity to repeat the course due to late admission, marks of in-course assessment and laboratory performance/ assessments in the previous year may be retained by the students.

 

 

3.2.6. Promotion to next academic year: To get promotion to the next academic year a student should obtain a minimum GPA 2.00 for 1st year to second year, and CGPA 2.25 for 2nd year to 3rd year and 2.50 for 3rd year to 4th year. However, for obtaining degree the CGPA of all academic years should be at least 2.50 having no ‘F’ grade in any course.

 

 

Year-wise List of Courses

First Year

Major Course

Course Code

Course Title

Time (h)

Credits

ACCE-101

Chemical Technology-I

3.0

2.5

ACCE-102

Mass and Energy Balance

3.0

2.5

ACCE-103

Chemical Engineering-I          

3.0

2.5

ACCE-104

Physical Chemistry-I

3.0

2.5

ACCE-105

Organic Chemistry-I

3.0

2.5

ACCE-106

Inorganic Chemistry-I 

3.0

2.5

ACCE-107

Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Lab

6.0

6.0

ACCE-108

Field Work

1.5

1.5

 

Viva-voce

-

1.0

Physics (minor)

PM-112

Properties of Matter

2.0

2.0

PM 122

Electricity and Magnetism

2.0

2.0

PML 103

1st Year Physics Minor Practical

2.0

2.0

Math. (minor)

MTM 104

Linear Algebra

2.0

2.0

MTM 105

Calculus

4.0

4.0

Total Credits

35.5

 

 

Second Year

Major Course

Course Code

Course Title

Time (h)

Credits

ACCE-201

Chemical Reaction Engineering

3.0

2.5

ACCE-202

Chemical Technology-II

3.0

2.5

ACCE-203

Fluid Mechanics

3.0

2.5

ACCE-204

Chemical Engineering-II

3.0

2.5

ACCE-205

Physical Chemistry-II

3.0

2.5

ACCE-206

Organic Chemistry-II

3.0

2.5

ACCE-207

Inorganic Chemistry-II

3.0

2.5

ACCE-208

Fundamentals of Computer Science and Engineering

3.0

2.5

ACCE-209

Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Lab

7.5

7.5

ACCE-210

Field Work

1.5

1.5

 

Viva-voce

-

1.0

Physics (minor)

PM-211

Geometrical Optics, Interference and Diffraction

2.0

2.0

PM-223

Electricity and Magnetism

2.0

2.0

Math. (minor)

MTM 202

Calculus II

2.0

2.0

MTM 203

Ordinary Differential Equations

2.0

2.0

Total Credits

38.0

 

 

Third Year

Course Code

Course Title

Time (h)

Credits

ACCE-301

Chemical Technology-III

3.0

3.0

ACCE-302

Chemical Engineering-III

3.0

3.0

ACCE-303

Chemical Engineering-IV

3.0

3.0

ACCE-304

Energy Resources (Petroleum & Coal based) Engineering & Technology

3.0

3.0

ACCE-305

Analytical Chemistry and Material Testing

3.0

3.0

ACCE-306

Materials Science & Engineering

3.0

3.0

ACCE-307

Electrochemical Engineering   

3.0

3.0

ACCE-308

Corrosion Engineering

3.0

3.0

ACCE-309

Metallurgy

3.0

3.0

ACCE-310

Industrial Economics, Psychology & Management

3.0

3.0

ACCE-311

Pharmaceutical Process & Technology-I

3.0

3.0

ACCE-312

Environmental Chemistry and Engineering          

3.0

3.0

ACCE-313

Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Lab

6.0

6.0

ACCE-314

Field Work

2.0

2.0

 

Viva-voce

-

1.5

Total Credits

45.5

 

 

 

Fourth Year

Course Code

Course Title

Time (h)

Credits

ACCE-401

Chemical Engineering-V

3.0

3.0

ACCE-402

Fertilizers and Agrochemical Technology

3.0

3.0

ACCE-403

Chemical Technology-IV

3.0

3.0

ACCE-404

Polymer Science and Engineering

3.0

3.0

ACCE-405

Instrumental Analysis-I

3.0

3.0

ACCE-406

Instrumental Analysis-II

3.0

3.0

ACCE-407

Petrochemical Technology

3.0

3.0

ACCE-408

Environmental Pollution & Industrial Waste Management                            

3.0

3.0

ACCE-409

Pharmaceutical Process & Technology-II                       

3.0

3.0

ACCE-410

Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Lab

6.0

6.0

ACCE-411

Project

3.0

3.0

ACCE-412

In-plant Training

3.0

3.0

 

Viva-voce

-

2.0

Total Credits

41.0

                                                                                                     Grand Total = 160 Credits

 

 

                                                                               

 

FIRST YEAR

 

ACCE-101: Chemical Technology-I

 

  • Introduction to Chemical Technology: Importance of chemical technology for industry and development of Chemical Technology. Basic principles of chemical technology and classification of chemical technological processes.

 

  • Design and implementation of a chemical project. Methods of carrying out a design project. Process development. Design information from literature. Techno-economic feasibility study. Selection of plant site, technology, utility services, instrumentation, storage and supply systems, waste disposal, health and safety aspects, maintenance. Construction and operation of a chemical industry. Materials of construction: Metals, alloys, non-metals, inorganic materials and organic materials.

 

  • Study of typical chemical-technological plants:

Water Conditioning and Water Treatment: Sources of water and water quality. Various physical and chemical methods of treatment. Municipal water supply and municipal water treatment processes. Boiler feed water (various quality parameters of water for boiler). Water for industrial uses and their treatment before feeding, sewage treatment and disposal. Industrial water treatment processes (primary, secondary and tertiary).

 

Ceramic Industries: Basic raw materials; chemistry related to ceramic industry; classification of ceramic products. Methods of manufacture of different ceramic products; white wares, structural clay products; refractories, special ceramic products, ceramic composites, ferro-electric and ferro-magnetic ceramics and space age ceramics.

 

Reference Books:

  1. Plant Design & Economics for Chemical Engineers by Max Peters and Timmerhaus.
  2. Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering, Warren L. McCabe, Julian C. Smith, Peter Harriott,   

       McGraw- Hill.

  1. Engineering Economy, G. J. Thuesen, W. J. Fabrycky, Prentice Hall.
  2. Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes -Pelder & Rousseal.
  3. A Text book of Engineering Chemistry - M. M. Uppal.
  4. Shreve’s Chemical Process Industries - Austin.

 

ACCE-102: Mass and Energy Balance

 

  • Principles of chemical engineering calculations, systems of units, process variables, basis of calculation.

 

  • Fundamental of Material Balance: Process classification; types of balances, principle and procedure of material balance. T

 

  • Stoichiometry, stoichiometric co-efficient stoichiometric ratio, stoichiometric proportion, limiting and excess reactant, conversion etc. Stoichiometric calculations in metallurgical and electrochemical reactions. Stoichiometric calculations on fuels and combustion. Classification of fuels. Calorific value of fuels. Theoretical and excess air for combustion. Calculations on solid, liquid and gaseous fuels.

 

  • Energy Balances: Trouton’s rule, Kistyakowsky equation for non-polar liquids, estimation of heat capacity, calculation of enthalpy changes with and without phase change, estimation of latent heat of vaporization, heat balance calculations in processes without chemical reaction, effect of temperature on heat of reaction, enthalpy change for mixtures, enthalpy-concentration charts and applications. Kirchoff’s equation. Adiabatic and non-adiabatic reactions. Calculation of heat of reaction of industrial reactions. Energy balance calculations without and with chemical processes.

 

  • Combined material and energy balance calculations and industrial problems.

 

Reference Books:

  1. K. V. Narayanan & B. Lakshmikutty, Stoichiometry and Process Calculations, Prentice Hall of India.
  2. Hougen A, Watson K. M, Ragatz R. A, Chemical Process Principles, John Wiley.
  3. David M. Himmelblau, Basic Principles and Calculations in Chemical Engineering, Prentice Hall.
  4. Richard M. Felder & Ronald W. Rousseau, Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes, Wiley India.
  5. B. I. Bhatt, and S. M. Vora, Stoichiometry (Third Ed), Tata McGraw Hill.
  6. Williams E. T, Johnson R. C, Stoichiometry for Chemical Engineers, McGraw Hill.
  7. Rao D. P, Murthy D. V. S, Stoichiometry for Chemical Engineers, McMillan.

 

ACCE-103: Chemical Engineering-I        

 

  • Introduction to unit processes and operations and their symbols, process flow sheet, dimensions and units, basic chemical calculations including mole, equivalent weights, solids, liquids, solutions and their properties, properties of gases. Chemical engineering: definition, origin, growth and role in chemical process industries. Professional ethics of a successful chemical engineer and intimate connections with other engineering and sciences stream.

 

  • Size Reduction: Particle size and shape, mixtures of particles. Size reduction equipments: Primary crushers, secondary crushers, intermediate & fine grinders, Ultra fine grinders, cutting machines, open circuit & closed circuit grinding. Industrial screening equipments: Standard screen series, screen analysis, determination of particle size. Screen effectiveness and capacity. Crushing efficiency, energy requirements,

 

  • Humidification & Dehumidification Processes: Introduction to humidification and dehumidification operations, characteristics of saturated and unsaturated vapor gas mixtures. Dry and wet bulb thermometry, humidity chart, adiabatic saturation temperatures, psychometric ratio, gas liquid contact. Design of humidifiers. Dehumidification operation. Principle and design of cooling towers (natural draft, forced draft and induced draft cooling towers).

 

  • Agitation and Mixing: Agitation of low viscosity particle suspensions: axial flow impellers, radial flow impellers, close clearance stirrer, unbaffled tanks, baffled tanks, basic idea for designing agitators. Power number, Froude number, power consumption in agitation. Mixing of Solids: Types of mixers, various mixers for cohesive solids, power requirements, mixing index, axial mixing. Mixers for free flowing solids: ribbon blenders, screw mixers, tumbling mixers import wheels, mixing index in blending granular solids, mixing index at zero time, rate of mixing.

 

  • Handling and Transport of Solids: Storage of solids, characteristics of bulk solids. Conveyors: Working principles, construction, advantages, disadvantages and design calculation of screw conveyors, belt conveyors, bucket elevators, pneumatic conveyors. Industrial trucks. Automated guided vehicles. Monorails and other rail guided vehicles. Cranes and hoists.

 

  • Industrial Hygiene: Government regulations, identification and evaluation and control of various exposures in chemical industry. Fires and explosions: fire triangle, flammability characteristics of liquids and vapors. Design to prevent fires and explosions. Hazard identification and risk assessment. Accident investigations and case histories.

 

Reference Books:

  1. McCabe, W. L., Smith J. C., and Harriot, P., “Unit Operations in Chemical Engineering”, McGraw-Hill, Inc.
  2. Coulson, J. M. and Richardson, J. F., “Chemical Engineering, Volume I”, Pergamon Press.
  3. Badger, L.W. Banchero, T. J. Introduction to Chemical Engineering, McGraw Hill.
  4. Anderson, L. B., Wenzel, L. A., “Introduction to Chemical Engineering. McGraw-Hill Book Company Inc., New York.
  5. Thompson, E. V., Ceckler, W. H. “Introduction to Chemical Engineering”, McGraw-Hill Book Company Ltd. (1977).
  6. Peters, M. “Elementary Chemical Engineering”, McGraw-Hill Book Company.
  7. Ghosal, S. K., Sanyal, S. K. and Datta, S. “Introduction to Chemical Engineering”, Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Ltd., New Delhi (1997).
  8. Basic Principles of Chem. Engg. By Felder & Rousseou, Edn. 3rd , Prentice Hall (2002).

                                             

ACCE-104: Physical Chemistry-I

 

  • Behavior of Ideal and Real Gases: Kinetic theory of gases, Joule-Thompson effect, equation of state for real gases, liquefaction of gases, vander Waals equation and the critical state, law of corresponding state, vapor pressure, Trouton's law.

 

  • The Liquids: Intermolecular forces in liquids (London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding), vapor pressure and its determination, surface tension, capillary action, measurement of surface tension. Interfacial tension, surface tension and temperature, viscosity and fluidity, measurement of viscosity, viscosity and temperature. Refractive index (specific refraction, molar refraction), determination of refractive index, optical activity, specific rotation, measurement of optical activity.

 

  • Solid State: Types of solids, solid crystals, miller indices, crystal structure, classification of crystals on the basis of bonds, structure of metal crystal, crystal defects, liquid crystal. Band theory of solids, simple inorganic compounds.

 

  • Thermodynamics: Introduction, first law of thermodynamics, reversible and irreversible processes, isothermal and adiabatic changes. Second law of thermodynamics, Carnot theorem, Entropy and free energy. Gibbs-Helmholtz equation, Classius-Clapeyron equation, third law of thermodynamics.

 

  • Thermochemistry: Laws of thermochemistry. Hess's law, Kirchoffs equation, heat of reaction, heat of formation, heat of solution, heat of neutralization, heat of combustion and bond energies.

 

  • Solution: Type of solutions, units of concentration, solution of gas in liquid, Henry's law. Solution of solid in liquid, solubility curve. Distribution law: its application and solvent extraction.

 

  • Dilute Solutions: Theory of dilute solutions, ideal solution, Raoults Law, colligative properties: (a) Lowering of vapor pressure, (b) Elevation of boiling point, (c) Depression of freezing point (d) Osmosis and osmotic pressure. Molecular weight from colligative properties, ideal and non-ideal solution.

 

  • Chemical Equilibrium: Law of mass action, equilibrium constants of some typical reaction, Le-Chatelier and Braun's principle, degree of dissociation and equilibrium constant.

 

  • Acid/Base Equilibria: Theories of indicators, pH and pH measurements, buffer solution. Acid base titration, solubility product principle and its application, common ion effect.

 

  • Kinetics and Catalysis: Rate and rate expressions of simple reaction, order and molecularity. First, second, third, zero and fractional order reactions with examples, Methods of determination of the orderof reactions. Theory of reaction rate. Types of catalysts, preparation and properties of catalyst, catalysis, retardation and poisoning, enzyme reactions.

 

Reference Books:

  1. A Text Book of Physical Chemistry-S. Glasstone.
  2. Principals of Physical Chemistry-Bhal and Tuli
  3. An Introduction to Physical Chemistry, Haque and Molla
  4. Practical Physical Chemistry – Findlay
  5. Chemical Thermodynamics - Steiner.
  6. Thermodynamics for Chemistry - S. Glasstone.
  7. Phase Rule - A. Findlay (Revised by campbell)
  1. Practical Physical Chemistry - Findlay
  2. Introduction to Electrochemistry - S. Glasstone.
  1. Physical Chemistry - Borrow

 

ACCE-105: Organic Chemistry-I

  

  • Hydrocarbons: Classification of hydrocarbons on the basis of hybridization, molecular orbital theory, geometry, bond angle etc. Isomerization and general reactions of alkanes (different substitution reactions, halogenation, cracking), alkenes (electrophilic addition, nucleophilic conjugate addition, oxidation, epoxidation/ring opening, ozonolysis, hydroboration, polymerization), stability of alkenes (Sytzeff rule), Markovnikov and anti-Markovnikov rule as applied to the electrophilic addition to unsymmetrical alkenes and alkynes (acidic properties, conversion to E Vs Z-alkenes). Uses of hydrocarbons.

 

  • Alkyl and Aryl Halides: Structure, preparation, manufacture and uses. Comparison of the C-X bond strength of alkyl and aryl halides, comparison of substitution reaction of alkyl halides and aryl halides, synthesis of alkyl and aryl halides, reaction of alkyl halides with alkali in different conditions, Wurtz reaction, organometallic compounds with special attention to the preparation, properties and uses of Grignard reagents and other organometallic compounds, safety and conditions for the synthesis of organometallic compounds.

 

  • Alcohols and Phenols: Structure, preparation, manufacture, physical properties and uses. Differentiation of 1˚, 2˚, 3˚ alcohols, test for the presence of -OH group, reactions of alcohol and phenol including enolate alkylation, reaction of enolate with aldehyde and ketone (aldol reaction), conjugate addition of enolate.

 

  • Carbonyl Compounds: Fundamentals of carbonyl and carboxyl chemistry, nature of carbonyl reactivity, explanation of the reactivity of different carbonyl compounds, preparation, manufacture, and uses of carbonyl compounds. Reactions of aldehyde and ketones (nucleophilic and conjugate addition, nucleophilic substitution) and carboxylic acid and its derivatives (acid halide, anhydride, amide), keto-enol tautomerism.

 

  • Aliphatic and Aromatic Amines: Structure, preparation, basicity with reference to pKa values and other properties, uses. Quaternary amines. Diazotization of aromatic amines and their coupling to obtain diazocompounds (dyes).

 

  • Cyclic and Heterocyclic Compounds: Structure of fused bicyclic and spirocyclic compounds, effect of ring size on the stability of cyclic compounds, Bayer-strain theory. Preparation, manufacture, properties and uses of pyridine, pyrole, furan, and thiophene. Synthesis of quinoline derivatives.

 

  • Biomolecules: Structure of amino acids, peptides and proteins, colour test for proteins. Structure of nucleic acid, DNA, DNA-replication and transcription. Structures of alkaloids, lipids, terpenes and stereoids.

 

Reference Books:

  1. Organic Chemistry: Clayden, Greeves, Warren and Wothers, Oxford University Press, 2001, NY.
  2. Organic Chemistry: Robert T. Morrison, Robert N. Boyd, Prentice Hall of India, 5th Ed. 1990, New Delhi.
  3. Organic Chemistry, Vol.-II: I. L. Finar, Longman, Low Price Ed.
  4. A Guide Book to Mechanism in Organic Chemistry,: Peter Sykes, Longman, 6th Ed. 1986.
  5. Biochemistry: Albert Lehlinger.

  

ACCE-106: Inorganic Chemistry-I     

   

  • Electronic Structure of Atom: Bohr's atom model, wave nature of electrons, the photoelectric effect, quantum numbers, shapes of the atomic orbitals, effective nuclear charge, and energies of orbitals, Aufbau principle, Pauli Exclusion Principle, Hund's rule, electron and ion electron configurations, magnetic properties of atoms.

 

  • Periodic Table: Periodic classification of elements and periodic properties.

 

  • Chemical Bonds: Electronic concept of chemical bonds, types of bonds. Elementary treatments of valence bond and molecular orbital theories, geometry of molecules, hybridization, and bond order. Other types of chemical bonds, shapes of molecules on the basis of valance shell electron pair repulsion theory (VSEPRT).

 

  • Inorganic Thermodynamics and Energetic: Bond energy terms, enthalpy, entropy, and thermodynamics of the formation of ionic and covalent compounds. The driving force of a reaction, lattice energy, Born-Haber cycle, energy of hydration, energy change of the solution process, ionization energies, electronegativity, electron affinity.

 

  • Oxidation and Reduction: Electronic concept, oxidation state and oxidation number. Writing of equations involving oxidation-reduction reactions, equivalent weights of oxidizing and reducing agents.

 

  • Acids and bases: Acid-base concepts, measuring of acid-base strength, hard and soft acids and bases.

 

  • Nuclear Chemistry: Radioactivity, patterns of nuclear stability, nuclear transmutations, rates of radioactive decay, detection of radioactivity, energy changes in nuclear reactions, nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, isotopes, isobar, isomers, methods of separation of isotopes, applications of radioisotopes, biological effects of radiation.

 

  • Common aspects of qualitative and quantitative analysis.

 

Reference Books:

  1. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry - Cotton & Wilkinson
  2. Inorganic Chemistry-R. D. Madan
  3. Introduction to Modern Inorganic Chemistry - S. Z. Haider.
  4. Advance Inorganic Chemistry S. Z. Haider.
  5. Basic Inorganic Chemistry - Cotton & Wilkinson.
  6. Nuclear & Radiochemistry - Friedlander & Kannedy.

 

 

ACCE-107: Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Lab (6.0 Credits)

 

  • Qualitative Inorganic Analysis (1.25 credits):

General Lab techniques. Techniques of detection, identification, separation and confirmation of presence of metals and non-metals, ions and (acidic and basic) radicals in inorganic salts, in mixtures employing semi-micro methods. Treatment of mixtures with interfering substances, their removal and analysis. Treatment of insoluble substances.

 

Reference Books:

  1. Qualitative Inorganic Analysis - Vogel.
  2. Quantitative Inorganic Analysis - Vogel.

 

  • Qualitative Organic Analysis (1.25 Credits):
  1. Preparation of different reagents used in qualitative organic analysis.
  2. Detection and identification of elements other than carbon in organic compounds.
  3. Identification of different types of organic compounds (solids and liquids) by solubility test, fusion test and group analyses, confirmation test, melting point and mixed melting point: halogen compounds, sulphur compounds, nitrogen compounds, phenols, ethers, carbonyl compounds (aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and other derivatives), amino compounds and phosphorus compounds.

                               

Reference Books:

  1. Qualitative Organic Analysis-Vogel
  2. Organic Identification - Clarke.
  3. A Text Book of Practical Organic Chemistry - Vogel

 

  • Volumetric Analysis (1.25 Credits):

Titrimitric analysis of acid-base, redox, complexometric etc. Analysis of typical ores, minerals and alloys.

 

  • Gravimetric Analysis (1.25 Credits):

Estimation of cations and anions e.g., iron, calcium, copper, zinc, sulfate, phosphate, chloride etc.

 

  • Workshop Practice (1.0 Credit):

Use of carpenter’s tools, common carpentering joints, work bench,

Use of measuring instruments.

Plumbing: Pipe and pipe fittings (elbow, bend, tee, cross, reducer, Y, plug bush, running nipple), gaskets, mechanical seal, oil, grease.

Familiarizing the students with the following processes:

Welding (arc welding, gas welding and spot welding), heat treatment, moulding and casting.

Simple machine shop processes, such as turning, knurling (drilling, thread cutting).

 

ACCE-108: Field Work (1.5 Credits)

 

At least two related industries should be visited and thoroughly studied.

 

Viva-voce: 1 Credit

 

 

Minor Courses

Physics

PM-112 Properties of Matter ( 2.0 Credits)

 

  1. Gravitation Theory: Newton’s Law, Gravitational Potential, Calculation of potential, Calculation of Potential and Force in Simple Cases, Escape Velocity. Planck Mass.
  1. Elementary Theory of Elasticity
  2. Hooke’s Law. Elastic Modulii, Relations between the Modulii, Bending of Beams Torsion.

 

  1. Surface Tension: Adhesive Force, Cohesive Force, Molecular Theory of Suirface, Tension, Capillarity, Surface Tension of a Mercury Drop, Variation of Surface Tension with Temperature.

 

  1. Viscosity: Newton’s Law of Streamline Flow. Poiseulle’s Formula, Applications, Variation of Viscosity with Temperature.

 

  1. Fluid Dynamics: Streamline Flow, Turbulence, Reynold’s Number, Bernoulli’s Theorem, Applications.

 

Reference Books:

  1. Physics: R. Resnick and D. Halliday (Wiley Eastern, New Delhi). Bangla translation published by the Bangla Academy is also available.
  1. Gases, Liquids and Solids; D. Tabor, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
  1. The Mechanical Properties of Matter: M. T. Sprackling.
  1. The General Properties of Matter: F. W. Newman and V. H. L. Searle. , Edward Arrold Publishers, London.
  1. Properties of Matter: S. Ahmed and A. K. Nath.

 

PM 122: Electricity and Magnetism ( 2.0 Credits)

 

  1. Electrostatics: Electric Intensity and Potential, Gauss’s Law, Electric Dipole, Density of Charge in a Polarised Dielectric, Gauss’s Law for charges in a Dielectric, Capacitance Co-efficient of Potential, Capacitance and Induction Energy of Charged Systems. Electrical Images.

 

  1. Magnetostatics: Gauss’s Law, Magnetic Dipole, Energy in a Magnetic Field.

 

  1. Direct Current: Current and Electromotive Force, Ohm’s Law. Combination of Resistances and Kirchhoff’s Laws’s Wheatstone Bridge.

 

  1. Magnetic Field of a Current and Ampere’s Law, Biot-Savar Law, Magnetic Fields of Simple Circuits, Galvanometers, Lorents Force, CRT.

 

  1. Electromagnetic Induction: Faraday’s Law, Self-Inductance, Mutual Inductance.

 

  1. Alternating Current: Generation of AC, RMS Value, Power Factor, CR and LR Circuits, Gain, Decible.

 

Reference Books:

  1. Physics: R, Resnick and D. Halliday, Wiley Eastern, New Delhi.
  1. Principles of Electricity: L. Page and N.L. Adams. D. Van Nostrand Company, N.J.
  1. Electricity and Magnetism: S. G. Starling, Longmann-Green and Co., London.
  1. Electromagnetic Fields and waves: Paul Lorrain and Dale Corson. D. B. Taraporevala Sons and Co., Bombay.
  1. Bidyat O Chumbak, A. M. Harun ar Rashid; Techno Mission, Gulshan, Dhaka.
  1. Foundations of Electromagnetic Theory: John R. Reitz, F. J. Milford and R. W. Christy Addison- Wesley. Mass, U.S.A.
  1. Concepts of Electricity and Magnetism, M. S. Huq- A. K. Rafiqullah and A. K. Roy, Students’ Publications, Dhaka.

 

 

 

PML 103: 1st Year Physics Minor Practical ( 2.0 Credits)

 

  1. Determination of the Value of g by compound pendulum.
  1. Determination of the spring constant and effective mass of a given spiral spring and hence to calculate the rigidity modulus of the material of the spring.
  1. Determination of Young’s Modulus and Modulus of Rigidity of the material of a wire by (Searle’s) dynamic method.
  1. Determination of surface tension of water at room temperature by capillary tube method.
  1. Determination of surface tension of mercury by quincke’s method.
  1. Variation of viscosity of water with temperature.
  1. Determination of the specific heat of a solid by the method of mixture with radiation correction.
  1. Determination of the specific heat of a liquid by the method of cooling.
  1. Verification of the laws of transverse vibration of a string. n-1, 1-T curves.

 

Mathematics

MTM 104: Linear Algebra ( 2.0 Credits)

 

  1. Matrices and Determinants: Notion of matrix, Types of matrices, Matrix operations, Laws of matrix Algebra, Determinant function, Properties of determinants, Minors, Cofactors, Expansion and Evaluation of Determinants, Elementary Row and Column Operations and Row-Reduced Echelon Matrices.

 

  1. System of Linear Equations: Linear equations, System of linear equations (homogeneous and non-homogeneous) and their solutions, Application of matrices and determinants for solving system of linear equations.

 

  1. Vector Spaces: Vector